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Thursday, September 13, 2012

PLO official talks "binational state," Hamas and Fatah slam him

From JPost:
Senior PLO official Ahmed Qurei said the Palestinian Authority is willing to discuss the formation of a bi-national state with Israel, if Israel gives up on the two-states solution, Israel Radio reported Thursday.

Speaking to Israeli reporters to mark 19 years since the signing of the Oslo Accords, Qurei said that while the Palestinian leadership supports the two-state solution, he accused Israel of sabotaging it.
A "binational state," of course, is a code word for the destruction of the Jewish state.

And Arabs have talked about such a state ever since they realized that a Jewish state might actually come about, in 1947 before the UN partition vote. The, too, they pretended that they would live in peace with the Jews, as long as the Jews would stay in their ghettoes and behave themselves according to the rules of dhimmitude.

But Hamas isn't having any of that.

Mahmoud Zahar cannot even stomach having any Jews in Palestine, or even giving lip service to Jews having any political say in their future, as he slammed the idea of a "binational state." He called the idea of negotiating with Israel on its own destruction "bankruptcy."

He then restated the Hamas position, that so many Western idiots think shows Hamas flexibility:

"We do not accept a two-state solution. We accept a state even on the land liberated from the 1967 territories, without any concessions from the rest of historic Palestine, with the right of future generations to return."

Hebrew media report that Fatah was against Qurei's idea as well - because, in a binational state, Jewish communities would still exist in Judea and Samaria!

In other words, according to the progressive, liberal Fatah party, Judea and Samaria must remain Judenrein no matter what - even in an Arab-majority "binational" Palestine!

Sounds like apartheid, doesn't it?

Maybe some outraged, moralistic Europeans will boycott Fatah for saying that they want Jew-free zones.