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Wednesday, November 07, 2007

How do you treat a hostile entity?

If you are Israel, you help it build sewage treatment plants:
Ahead of the winter and fearing that sewage cesspools in Gaza could once again spill over and flood nearby villages, the IDF Coordination and Liaison Administration (CLA) has stepped up efforts to enable the Palestinians to complete the construction of a new sewage plant in the coming months.

...Defense officials explained that the decision to expedite the construction was made despite Hama's control over Gaza.

"We are doing this to help the Palestinians and to prevent another overflow," a defense official said. "There are security risks involved, but this is an important project and it is our job to figure out how to deal with them."

...To help facilitate the new plant's construction, the IDF has tracked down non-metal pipes that can be used in the facility without fear of their going toward Kassam rocket production, as metal pipes imported into Gaza have in the past.

In addition, the IDF has allowed the Palestinian water authority officials to work alongside the border fence near Beit Hanun, even though the construction has been used in the past as a cover for the launching of rockets and attacks against Israel.
When in history has any nation so bent over backwards to help its implacably hostile neighbor? Look at all the resources the hated IDF is giving to helping Palestinian Arabs who support Israel's destruction.

In the past, Hamas and others have used this very same Israeli generosity and benevolence against it. And even so, Israel continues to assist the terrorists and their supporters for humanitarian reasons.

Anyone who tries to claim that the conflict is symmetric, that both sides are equally at fault or that both sides are equally intolerant, would need to provide examples of Arab benevolence helping Israel. The very absurdity of imagining an Arab government donating money to Zaka or Hadassah Hospital or Mogen Dovid Adom is proof enough that there is no moral comparison between the two sides.